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An Immersive Dynamic World

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By: 

Wobbe F. Koning, Monmouth University

In this assignment, orginally included in Faculty Submitted Student Work (FSSW) 2018, students create a 360 degree render from a virtual world they created using Autodesk Maya.

The first PDF contains the Assignment description as submitted to FSSW.

The second PDF contains instruction slides on 360 degree video, and other subjects pertaining to the assignment.

A video with the rendered worlds, created buy students in Spring 2018, in 360 degree VR can be veiwed here:

VR Quick Start Guide

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By: 

Wobbe F. Koning, Monmouth University

As faculty member teaching computer graphics and interactive techniques you may desire, or it may be required of you, to incorporate Virtual Reality (VR) into your curriculum. This page is intended to provide some pointers to get started. It is not comprehensive, a more complete curated list of VR resources is currently in preparation

Creating a Modern Classic Visual Effect

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By: 

Ken Cameron, University of Bath

To support filmmakers, effects teams must understand both how visual effects have been created in the past and how to develop software to deliver them in the modern context. This assignment asks students to work in small groups to replicate a classic visual effect that was originally created in camera.

the VR ride: a cross disciplinary assignment in computer graphics and interactivity

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By: 

Nick Jushchyshyn, Robert Lloyd, and Erik Sundquist, Drexel University.

The “VR Ride” assignment challenges students to create an interactive VR computer graphics experience integrated with a themed ride. The ride apparatus must fully support the users weight, utilize the user’s body motions as a primary input for computer interactivity, and provide haptic feedback relevant to the VR experience.

Image ditching: manipulating images with audio effects

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By: 

Erik Brunvand, School of Computing, University of Utah

Image glitching and data-bending are used to introduce image formats, data manipulation, and data visualization to beginning CS students and non-major students taking computing courses with no coding required.

Academy Software Foundation

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By: 

Wobbe F. Koning, ACM SIGGRAPH Education Committee

ASWF provides a neutral forum for open source software developers in the motion picture and broader media industries to share resources and collaborate on technologies for image creation, visual effects, animation, and sound.

How To Debug GPU-Based Programs?

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By: 

Ying Zhu (PI) and G. Scott Owen (Co-PI), Computer Science Department, Georgia State University

This web site contains three comprehensive debugging guides for GPU based programming: OpenGL, WebGL, and OpenCL. The target audience is college students taking 3D graphics programming courses, game programming courses, or heterogeneous computing courses. Novice to intermediate level 3D graphics or GPGPU programmers can benefit from learning GPU debugging techniques. Instructors can use this web site to supplement their regular course materials.

URL: https://sites.google.com/site/debuggpuprograms/

US 3D Animation School Survey

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By: 

Miho Aoki, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA

In this document we present the results of a survey of faculty members teaching in programs where course in 3D Computer Graphics and Animation are offered in the United States. The survey consists of 30 questions and was conducted on-line through Surveymonkey.com. The survey was open from August 2010 through to January 2011.

Survey of Computer Art Applications

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By: 

Charles Shami, Professor of Interactive Design and Game Development, Savannah College of Art and Design

This class is for students already well versed in the use of art and design computer applications. The basic components of digital design tools—vector, raster, modeling language and animation—are covered, culminating in the completion of a final project. Following an overview of HTML and Web page design, students create their own home pages.

High Dynamic Range Imaging

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By: 

Kirt Witte, Professor of Visual Effects, Savannah College of Art and Design.

High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRi) emphasizes the integration of computer-generated objects or characters into real world video or film footage. High Dynamic Range Imaging seeks to develop and integrate photography, lighting, and rendering into various 3D and 2D software applications by utilizing digital images containing light information more accurately than traditional digital imaging means